Famous Oil Painting Location Photos Then and Now

Guillaumin, Armand — Armand Guillaumin Notre Dame de Paris

Armand Guillaumin Notre Dame de Paris

Notre Dame de Paris Then and Now Photo and Oil Painting.

Armand Guillemin painting of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, showing the Pont de l'Archeveche on the left and the Pont Saint Louis on the right. Although the bridge on the left is still standing as the original bridge, the bridge on the right in the painting has been updated.

A suspension bridge supplanted it in 1842. Twenty years later, this was replaced by a metallic bridge, with a single arch, the one appearing in the painting. In 1939, this one was also demolished. In 1941, it was replaced by a "passerelle" resembling an iron cage. And finally, In 1968, the present bridge (in the photo) was begun, and inaugurated in 1970. Guillemin painted many scenes on the Seine during the reconstruction on the banks of the Seine River.

Read the interesting biography of Guillaumin and see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Armand Guillaumin. Click Notre Dame de Paris if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Hopper, Edward — Edward Hopper Nighthawk

Edward Hopper Nighthawk

Nighthawk Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

People say the scene was inspired by a diner since demolished in Greenwich Village, Hopper's neighborhood in Manhattan. Hopper himself said the painting "was suggested by a restaurant on Greenwich Avenue where two streets meet." Additionally, he noted that "I simplified the scene a great deal and made the restaurant bigger." This has led Hopper aficionados to look for the original location in vain.

The Nighthawk Painting Location is Obvious & has been Found.

The spots usually associated with the former location is a now-vacant lot known as Mulry Square at the intersection of Seventh Avenue South, Greenwich Avenue, and West 11th Street, about seven blocks North West of Hopper's studio on Washington Square. But, according to an article by Jeremiah Moss in The New York Times, this cannot be the location of the diner that inspired the painting as a gas station occupied that lot from the 1930s to the 1970s. Moss located a land-use map in a 1950s municipal atlas showing that "Sometime between the late '30s and early '50s, a new diner appeared near Mulry Square." The diner was located immediately to the right of the gas station, "not in the empty northern lot, but on the southwest side, where Perry Street slants." Either way, the supposed location, is not the location.

So in 1942 when it was sold, no one took a photo of the possible location of the painting? No one made a sketch? No one made any notes about the location? Is everything left to speculation?

Well, I think we have been lead on a wild goose chase and the true location is Greenwich St. and Christopher St. Since there is a Greenwich Ave. and a Greenwich St. it could have been easily confused or Hopper changed the street to throw people off from finding it.

Interpretation of the Nighthawks Oil Painting.

It is Hopper's most renowned and is a standout among the most unmistakable compositions in American art. Within months of its completion, it was sold to the Art Institute of Chicago for $3,000 and has stayed there from that point forward.

In the background, through the darkened windows of an anonymous storefront, one can just make out a cash register, a silent but meaningful symbol of money's dominant and indispensable role in modern society. The mysterious character seen from behind seems to be staring into the glass in his hand, lost in thought. He resembles the classic Hollywood stereotype of the “stranger”. The customers on the far right side of the counter recall images from American cinema of that period, the woman checking her nail polish, the man with the cigarette staring into space. The hands of the two figures are almost touching, but Hopper gives no clue whether or not this contact is intentional. The barman is the only character who shows any vitality at all, rather he is doing his job, not interacting with the customers.

A subtle but very important detail is the series of round stools at the counter. These empty stools wait for other customers, other stories, and for other secrets to emerge from the night. They also embody what is the most bitter aspect of Hopper's urban scenes, the chance encounters, the fleeting contacts, and the hidden recesses of private lives, all set in anonymous, monotonous, soulless contexts. The wide deserted sidewalk makes the scene strangely, with all the figures pushed to the right of the composition, in the shelter of the night diner, while the ample stretch of empty street conveys a sense of loneliness and uneasiness.

Read the interesting biography of Hopper and see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Edward Hopper. Click Nighthawk if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Hopper, Edward — Edward Hopper House By The Railroad

Edward Hopper House By The Railroad

House By The Railroad Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

The house is on the west side of Rt. 9W, three houses north of the intersection of Main and 9W in Haverstraw, NY, on the Hudson River. The house has had some renovations.

The left photo shows the railroad tracks, the house is to the far right. The middle photo shows the house at the same angle as the painting and the right photo is the oil painting. Hopper is known for changing scenes, adding or deleting things for the sake of the painting. So this house by the railroad tracks, about 3 hours north of New York City where he lived, is the correct house. It is said that this painting was an inspiration for the house used in the Psyco movie in the 60s.

Click House By The Railroad if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Hopper, Edward — Edward Hopper Nighthawk Painting Location Found

Edward Hopper Nighthawk Painting Location Found

Nighthawk Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

Continued from the above discussion. So why these streets, Greenwich St and Christopher Ave? Look at the painting and the then and now photo comparison, you see that the corner of the building has curved glass. Also, the window in the background is shorter in length overall than the window in the foreground. Now, look at the photo. Same thing, the left side window is shorter in length than the right side window. But most importantly, the corner of the building itself is rounded, therefore able to accommodate a rounded curved glass window as in the painting. This glass would not work on a flat right angle cornered building. Yet, everyone has been looking for the location without regard to the architectural style of the building, which is one of the most important factors.

This type of glass would not work nor can be can be put in a flat right angle cornered building. Yet, everyone has been looking for the location without regard to the architectural style of the building, which is one of the most important factors.

Hopper, Edward — Edward Hopper East Wind Over Weehawken

Edward Hopper East Wind Over Weehawken

East Wind Over Weehawken Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

Edward Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken was painted in 1934. It is a street scene depicting the gabled house at 1001 Boulevard East at the corner of 49th Street in Weehawken, New Jersey, and is considered one of Hopper's best works. A lot of things have changed in the over 80 years since this work of art was completed, the house is still there, but the empty lot at the bottom right is still an empty lot, now made into a little park. This painting was recently sold for $40.5 million at Christie's in NY in 2013, which is a record price for his work.

If you would like to purchase East Wind Over Weehawken, you can save $40,499.780 by clicking here.

Monet, Claude — Claude Oscar Monet Arrival of the Normandy Train Gare Saint Lazare

Claude Oscar Monet Arrival of the Normandy Train Gare Saint Lazare

Arrival of the Normandy Train Gare Saint Lazare Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

The Gare Saint-Lazare was then and is now the biggest and busiest train station in Paris. Early in 1877, after his return to France from London, with the assistance of his companion Gustave Caillebotte, Claude Monet leased an apartment and a studio close to the Gare St-Lazare train station

In the nearby Rue Moncey, he started the first of 12 paintings showing this symbol of modernity. He showed seven of them, including this one, at the Third Impressionist Exhibition, in April of that year. Legend has it that he masterminded to have the standing trains fed with additional coal so he could watch and paint the effects of belching steam, dull gray when caught inside the station, white and cloud-like when seen against the sky. Monet's excellent perspectives of the Gare St-Lazare look like inside scenes, with smoke from the engines making an indistinguishable effect as clouds in the sky. Quick brush strokes show the sparkling motors to one side and the horde of travelers on the platform. This painting is one of only four remaining paintings of the inside of the station. Trains and railways had been depicted in earlier Impressionist works and by Turner in his 'Rain, Steam and Speed', yet were not by and large viewed as stylishly satisfactory subjects.

Read the interesting biography of Monet and see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Claude Oscar Monet. Click Arrival of the Normandy Train Gare Saint Lazare if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Munch, Edvard — Edvard Munch The Scream

Edvard Munch The Scream

It was in 1889 that Edvard Munch started to spend the first of many summers in Asgardstrand, Norway. In 1897 he bought a spartan fisherman's cottage built at the end of the 18th century in the town near the fjord and the Oslofjord appears in several of his paintings, including The Scream and Girls on the Pier. The house he bought is less than 200 feet from the fjord and piers. The Scream was painted in 1893, four summers after he arrive in the town.

In this photo, taken from the street, shows the concrete jetty that has long ago replaced the original wood pier. Both photo and painting show the beach and background hills.

It is said that the scene of The Scream was based on a real, actual place located on the hill of Ekeberg, Norway, on a path with a safety railing. The faint city and landscape represent the view of Oslo and the Oslo Fjord. At the bottom of the Ekeberg hill was the madhouse where Edvard Munch’s sister was kept, and nearby was also a slaughterhouse.

We disagree, because art critics rarely agree on anything and none do much research into the actual location of the paintings. So we provide our own idea. He bought a house 200 feet from the water, near piers, in a small quiet town, 50 miles south of Oslo. Normal people, standing on a rickty pier at night by themselves, might have uneasy feelings or fears. Now, you take a person that is starting to go slightly crazy and strange, in the same scenario. And it is very easy to see how his mind would start to envision these sights and start to hear noises or voices.  Because of his loose painting style in this painting, the clouds, the hills, the fjiord and the beach, can be manipulated any way he likes. Thereby throwing actual locations out the window.

So we went to his town, found what looks the closest location from his painting, in the town he lived in.

Munch, Edvard — Edvard Munch The Scream

Edvard Munch The Scream

The Scream Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

The location of The Scream is Valhallvein road, which is a hillside road sitting above Oslo, Norway and its harbor. Towards the upper left corner of the first photo, it shows the harbor jutting out, thereby separating the two coves that are shown in the painting.

It is said that the scene of The Scream was based on a real, real place located on the hill of Ekeberg, Norway, on a path with a safety railing. The faint city and landscape represent the view of Oslo and the Oslo Fjord. At the bottom of the Ekeberg hill was the crazy house where Edvard Munch’s sister was kept, and adjacent was also a slaughterhouse.

Normal people, standing on a dark forested road at night by themselves, might have uneasy feelings or fears. Now, you take a person that is starting to go slightly crazy and strange, in the same scenario. And it is very easy to see how his mind would start to envision these sights and start to hear noises or voices.

Read the interesting biography of Munch and see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Edvard Munch. Click The Scream if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Percy, Sidney Richard — Sidney Richard Percy A Rest on the Roadside

Sidney Richard Percy A Rest on the Roadside

A Rest on the Roadside Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

Sidney Richard Percy's art interests were not restricted to painting as he was also a novice picture taker, in a day when photography was new and exciting, yet still a poorly comprehended medium. He habitually utilized his own photographs of gypsies in the Barnes or Wimbledon Common as the basis for comparable figures in his oil paintings.

An illustration of this is Storm Gathering on Cader Idris, North Wales, which he exhibited in 1856 at the Royal Academy, and which has the same young gypsy girls in it as one of seven of his photographs on exhibit in the Victoria and Albert Museum. These same young ladies appear in his 1861 work A Rest on the Roadside shown above, and they show up once more, but reversed, in his 1873 version of Llyn-y-Ddinas, North Wales, demonstrating that he rehashed themes when convenient. The photo of the two gypsy girls in the Barnes Common, London are utilized as a part of this artwork A Rest on the Roadside, on the left side is the photograph used as models for his painting, the center photo is the full painting, the girls are in the lower center of the painting, and the right photograph shows the enlarged girls in the painting.

Read the interesting biography of Percy, see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Sidney Richard Percy. Click A Rest on the Roadside if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.

Picabia, Francis — Francis Picabia Notre Dame The Effect Of Sunlight

Francis Picabia Notre Dame The Effect Of Sunlight

Notre Dame The Effect Of Sunlight Then & Now Photo and Oil Painting.

Notre Dame Cathedral has been painted many times by numerous celebrated, its play on light and dark shadows is outstanding. In this painting by Picabia, based on the perspective angel of the church, it is painted not looking from ground level but a higher location.

So we assume he took a rented a small room across the Seine at a hotel the nearby Place Du Petit Pont and from an upper floor room in the hotel, he sketched and painted this oil painting. Only from up high, can the perspective and angle of the cathedral be the same as in his oil painting. The height of the majority of Paris buildings is five or six stories tall.

Read the interesting biography of Picabia, see all the famous oil painting reproductions by Francis Picabia. Click Notre Dame The Effect Of Sunlight if you like the oil painting and want to purchase it.