Gustave Caillebotte Biography | Oil Painting Reproductions

8-19-1848 Paris, FRA – 2-21-1894 Paris, FRA

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Caillebotte, Gustave

Gustave Caillebotte early oil paintings feature the broad new boulevards and modern apartment blocks. As a result of an increasing bourgeoisie, Baron Georges Haussmann changed the face of the city in the 1850s and '60s by tearing up old Parisian quarters and installing new boulevards, buildings, and bridges.

Caillebotte Painting the New Paris Boulevards.

Street scenes, viewed from Gustave Caillebotte's apartment on Boulevard Haussmann, have daring plunging views and often appear empty and silent as if drained of the reality of an urban metropolis. Caillebotte's exaggerated perspectives and bleached light expose a harsher new city with balcony views incorporating interiors and exteriors. Impressionists, for the most part, used it as a device to depict the penetration of light in a room.

Modern artists, also influenced by new scientific theories of color, by contemporary photography and by the dramatic perspectives of Japanese prints, set about to destroy Renaissance ideas of composition and space. One such method consisted of cropping the pictorial surface to evoke fragments of reality. When Gustave Caillebotte presented The Floor Scrapers at an Impressionist exhibition, his bold perspective and virtuoso tonal control was considered vulgar and was greeted with scorn by the traditionalists. An important realist component remained in French painting for a long time and is even to be found in Impressionism.

The French Government Reluctantly takes Caillebotte's Oil Paintings.

At the time of Caillebotte's death in 1894, the Impressionists were still being denounced by the art establishment in France, which was dominated by Academic Art and the Académie des Beaux-Arts. Because of this, Caillebotte understood that the cultural artistic value in his collection would likely vanish into "attics and provincial museums". He thus stipulated that they must be shown in the Luxembourg Palace devoted to the work of living artists, and afterward in the Louvre.

Sadly, the French government would not consent to these terms. In February 1896, they at long last arranged terms with Renoir, who was the will's executor, under which they took thirty-eight of the canvases to the Luxembourg.

Caillebotte's posthumous bequest of his art collection to the French government was accepted only reluctantly by the state. At the point when the Caillebotte Room opened at the Luxembourg Palace in 1897, it was the first exhibition of Impressionist paintings ever to be shown in a French museum, in this way solidifying his stature as one of the great world's artist. Gustave Caillebotte was an artist of amazing abilities, yet after his death, his posthumous reputation languished on the grounds that the greater part of his artworks stayed in the hands of his family and was not shown nor reproduced until the end of the 1970's.

Forty of Gustave Caillebotte's works are now exhibited at the Musée d'Orsay. His Man on a Balcony, Boulevard Haussmann, sold for US$14.3 million in 2000.

Art Movement History: Impressionism, Realism
Artists Influencing Gustave Caillebotte: Léon Florentin Bonnat
Painters Gustave Caillebotte Influenced: Edward Hopper
From Wikipedia

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